Hisham: Missing Malaysia Airlines plane the Stories we tell and the stories we don’t

 

Families of passengers aboard missing flight MH370 are launching a crowdsourcing campaign to raise rewards for whistle-blowers and private investigators to reveal key details about the investigation, reported USA Today.

The US daily said a US$3 million (RM10 million) reward will be raised for a whistle-blower while a $2 million fund will be set aside for private investigators to follow up on leads.

Almost three months after the plane en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing dropped off radar, relatives are frustrated by the failure of the official search to find evidence, with some believing that authorities are concealing the truth.

A jet like this: Here's a Boeing 777 Malaysia Airlines jet, with the registration number 9M-MRO, flying over Poland last month, on 5 February, 2014.


Missing Malaysia Airlines plane the Stories we tell and the stories we don’t

Acting Transport Minister Datuk Seri Hishammuddin Hussein said the raw satellite data is with Inmarsat but the British firm has denied it and said it is with the investigators. – The Malaysian Insider pic, May 16, 2014.

 Was missing Malaysia Airlines plane was ‘shot down in military training exercise’?

LONDON: The missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 was shot down during a joint Thai-US military training exercise and then the subject of an elaborate international cover-up — according to a book released about the lost plane that has caused anger among the relatives of those on board.

On Monday, just 71 days after the Boeing 777 vanished en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing, “Flight MH370: The Mystery” will go on sale in Australia, Sun-Herald reported.

It has been written by the Anglo-American journalist and author Nigel Cawthorne, who describes his London-based home as a “book-writing factory” and is most famous for his Sex Lives series of “salacious tales” about the rich and famous.

Cawthorne introduces his book by claiming that the families of MH370’s passengers will “almost certainly” never be sure what happened to their loved ones.

But he goes on to support one theory, based on the eye-witness testimony of New Zealand oil rig worker Mike McKay, that the plane was shot down shortly after it stopped communicating with air traffic controllers.

At the time there was a series of war games taking place in the South China Sea involving Thailand, the US and personnel from China, Japan, Indonesia and others, and Cawthorne has linked this to McKay’s claims to have seen a burning plane going down in the Gulf of Thailand.

“The drill was to involve mock warfare on land, in water and in the air, and would include live-fire exercises,” Cawthorne said.

“Say a participant accidentally shot down Flight MH370. Such things do happen. No one wants another Lockerbie [Pan Am flight 103 by terrorists in 1988 allegedly in retaliation for a US Navy strike on an Iranian commercial jet six months earlier], so those involved would have every reason to keep quiet about it.”

Cawthorne then suggests that “another black box” could have been dropped off the coast of Australia to divert the efforts of search teams. “After all, no wreckage has been found in the south Indian Ocean, which in itself is suspicious,” he wrote.

Irene Burrows, whose son and daughter-in-law were passengers on board MH370 when it disappeared, told Sun-Herald of her anger at the book’s release.

“Nobody knows what happened so why would anyone want to put out a book at this stage?” she said.

“There’s absolutely no answers. It’s devastating for the families. It’s 10 weeks tomorrow and there’s nothing.”

The release of Cawthorne’s book came as Rupesh Paul promoted a film to be made about the missing plane, entitled The Vanishing Act, at the Cannes Film Festival.

Though associate director Sritama Dutta said the film had “no similarities” to MH370 because the “true facts keep changing every day”, a trailer posted to YouTube on Saturday and promotional posters suggest it reveals “the untold story” of the Malaysia Airlines flight.

Paul told Variety he plans to release the film worldwide in September. In March, an Australian film called Deep Water was shelved because it contained “uncomfortable similarities” to the disappearance of MH370.

  

Inmarsat refutes Putrajaya, says raw data handed over to MH370 search team, reports CNN

The British satellite firm responsible for pinpointing missing MH370’s flight path has refuted Putrajaya’s remarks yesterday that it had yet to release its raw data.
The firm said it had submitted all information to investigators leading the search.
“Inmarsat’s raw data was provided to the investigation team at an early stage in the search for MH370,” Chris McLaughlin, the company’s vice-president of external relations, told CNN today.
He was responding to acting Transport Minister Datuk Seri Hishammuddin Hussein’s remarks yesterday that the raw data was with Inmarsat and not with those leading the search or even with Malaysia Airlines.
“The raw data is with Inmarsat, not with Malaysia, not with Australia, not with Malaysia Airlines.
“So if there is any request for this raw data to be made available to the public, it must be made to Inmarsat,” he said during a press conference on MH370 in Kuala Lumpur yesterday.
McLaughlin said that the company had the highest confidence in the analysis of its data, adding that the matter of releasing the information was in the hands of the investigators.
CNN also reported Inmarsat as saying that the Convention on International Civil Aviation prevents the release of findings from an investigation without the consent from the state conducting the investigation.
Commenting on the contradicting statements by Inmarsat and Putrajaya, CNN aviation analyst Miles O’Brien said he did not know who to believe and that one party was not telling the truth.
“I don’t know who to believe. But isn’t it awful that it’s quite evident somebody is lying here? Somebody is lying.
“We’re talking about something that involves a missing airliner, now 70 days. Lives lost, families shattered. And there (are) people lying about this. This is absolutely reprehensible. I can’t even believe… it would be funny if it wasn’t so tragic,” he said.
Aviation attorney Arthur Rosenberg told CNN he believed the satellite company was obligated to release the data, whether or not Malaysian authorities have it.
“Unfortunately, you almost get the sense that they’re stalling, that there’s something in there that they don’t want the world to see. And that’s the problem,” O’Brien said. “That’s why there’s so little credibility right now about why this search zone has been identified.”
Earlier this month, families of passengers aboard MH370 had implored Putrajaya to release the raw data so that it could be verified for accuracy.
“We implore the Malaysian government to share and release the raw Inmarsat satellite engine ping data for 9MMRO until the final signal was received globally so that it can be subject to broader analysis by relevant experts,” said Voice370, which is made up of family members of passengers and crew members aboard the plane.
The plea by Voice370 came after Putrajaya released its widely-criticised preliminary report on the missing flight.
Bill Palmer, an airbus A330 captain who wrote a book on the Air France 447 crash, had compared the lack of detail in the five-page preliminary report to preliminary reports from other accidents, including the Air France tragedy.
After a fruitless two months of scouring the southern Indian Ocean for wreckage, search officials are now seeking the expertise of private companies to aid in the search.
Hishammuddin had said yesterday that all air and surface searches had been suspended and the focus now would be on undersea operations.
Putrajaya is in the process of acquiring tools from companies such as Petronas, Sapura Kencana, Boustead and DEFTECH, he had said.
For a little over seven years now, I have contributed columns to the Huffington Post on the subject of civil liberties and America’s wars. It sounds strange to see it like that, in the plural, America’s wars.But that is the way to say it if we want to be honest. Since 2003, we have been a country famous for not merely the occasional war, dedicated to the destruction of an enemy by air power (as in Vietnam) or by a proxy army on the ground (as in Nicaragua). We are also the world’s innovator of preventive wars, “wars of choice” against selected target countries such as Iraq or Libya. Our leaders in both parties have consented to a state of things in which the fame of the United States is tested and must be proved by continuous engagement in multiple wars. And if not wars, then widely distributed black-ops killings, in faraway places where the United States is said to have vital interests. Those killings now come under the official description counterterrorism, which is a way of saying: terrorism by the right people.
The column that appears below this one, “What 9/11 Makes Us Forget,” was originally published on the tenth anniversary of the attack of September 11, 2001, and it is reprinted in my book of essays, Moral Imagination. It occurred to me that the shorthand notation “9/11” was being used as a conversation stopper. The name of the date cut off argument; it worked to prevent thinking.
How then can we come to think again? The effects of any war on civil liberties are poisonous. The initial panic and built-up structures of the War on Terror were bound to lead, as they have done, to the amassing of new powers of arrest and detainment and to the surveillance of U.S. citizens as well as foreign suspects. The new powers were hoarded at first in secret, and later, under pressure, were sometimes defended in public. The overriding aim of the surveillance state has become apparent over the last decade and especially in the last year. It is, as Glenn Greenwald has said, to secure the destruction of privacy worldwide, and to create a monopoly on the benefits derivable from the destruction.
My columns have been written as occasional reports on the symptoms of this double crisis. The reports have taken the form of a political diary, but I imposed from the start certain restrictions on subject matter and presentation. (1) To write only about events which seemed significant but which were in danger of passing quickly from view. (2) To analyze not the immediate political uses of an incident for a given political actor or interest, but the forces in play under the surface. (3) To shun the first-person singular (the present column is an exception).
But what are “forces in play under the surface”? If you keep track of the news in these extraordinary times, a story that seems anomalous may remind you of an earlier story that seemed unusual in the same way. So, in May 2009, the justice department called off the prosecution of what seemed a well-supported case against two AIPAC agents, Steven Rosen and Keith Weissmann, for spying on the U.S. government. That the case had been brought to trial at all, it might be said, was as unusual as its being suddenly stopped. But to a reader of the news, alert to the complexities of U.S. power in the War on Terror, the story jogged a memory.
In 2004, the FBI had launched an investigation into actions of the Iraqi politician Ahmed Chalabi, the adviser-in-exile enthusiastically cited by the neoconservatives who pressed hardest for the war on Iraq. The investigation of Chalabi had been unexpected, too; and as with the prosecution of AIPAC agents, an action by the justice department, surprisingly launched, had been as abruptly terminated. To a reader who prefers innocent explanations, this might argue nothing more than two cases of similar contours, in both of which the FBI put itself forward to detect a wrong and was then reined in. But reined in by whom? On a less innocent reading, we were seeing the signs of an internal conflict in government that evaded public view.
Maybe this story was not worth pursuing. I cite it as an example of the kind of story that has appeared with peculiar frequency since 2001 and that rarely gets followed up. Blogs may serve a civic purpose in reminding the mainstream press of aberrations they seem to be continually unearthing and continually leaving behind. There is, indeed, nothing surprising in the fact that a Republican attorney general for political reasons called off an investigation that might prove embarrassing to his boss; or the fact that a Democratic attorney general, covering for a president under attack by the Israel lobby during his first months in office, called off a prosecution that might have proved highly impolitic. Then again, maybe the similarity between the two incidents does require attention. At least, we should be surprised by the fact that we are not surprised.
These things come up every day. Consider today, for example, the headlines about the sacking of Jill Abramson as executive editor of the New York Times. The publisher of theTimes, A.O. Sulzberger, said that the reason she was dropped had to do with Abramson’s bad management of the newsroom; and supporting statements adequately testify to her “condescension,” “brusque manner,” and so on — all of which seems credible enough — and yet the same qualities were compatible with a longer run for some of her predecessors.
Meanwhile, there has emerged a rival account, which points out that Abramson recently asked for a salary raise after learning that the male editor who preceded her had received higher pay. This is said to have been the more serious cause of discord; and this, too, sounds credible — but again not really sufficient. There is one clue however, possibly no more telling than the above, which has been oddly neglected in the first round of journalistic motive-hunting.
The national and international stories that loom largest today have emerged from documents supplied to the news media by the whistleblower Edward Snowden. These documents have turned up facts concerning the ambition and the immense resources deployed by the NSA for the secret surveillance of private persons, companies, and governments. The New York Times was initially passed over by Snowden because its previous editor, Bill Keller, at the urging of the Bush administration had suppressed a major story on warrantless surveillance in 2004. But the paper in this area has grown a little braver; some of Snowden’s documents were eventually transferred to it by theGuardian; and Jill Abramson has been straightforward in defending the commitment of theTimesIn an interview in January on Al Jazeera, asked whether Snowden was a traitor or a hero, she replied: “I view him, as I did Julian Assange and Wikileaks, as a very good source of extremely newsworthy information.” The Times under Abramson, in short, was not first on the story and it was not second or third, but it did not avoid the controversy the NSA revelations might bring. So much for Abramson; what about her successor, the managing editor Dean Baquet? Forget for a moment the clichés and the public-relations “narratives,” the PC alarm at the sacking the first female editor, muffled by the cool vibe of hiring in her place the first African-American editor. Has Baquet had any relationship to the NSA stories at the New York Times or elsewhere?
In fact, he had an intimate involvement in such a story early in the War on Terror. Documents supplied to the Los Angeles Times by Mark Klein, an AT&T employee troubled by violations of civil liberties, showed that the NSA had constructed a building within the company building and was monitoring internet transactions. Klein and the Los Angeles Times reporter who worked on the story, Joe Menn, were given to understand that theirs was front-page material. Two months passed. The editor of the Los Angeles Times agreed to meet with Michael Hayden, the director of the NSA, and John Negroponte, the Director of National Intelligence; and after speaking with those officials, the editor killed the story. The editor who did that was Dean Baquet. He said afterward that his choice not to publish had nothing to do with his prior consultation with the highest officials in charge of government surveillance; rather, Baquet just could not see the story in the story — “we did not have a story…we could not figure out what was going on.”
The New York Times disagreed; and in April 2006 Mark Klein’s facts were published, in a story by John Markoff and Scott Shane; four days later, a Times editorial backed the paper’s commitment by posing questions about the legal limits of secret surveillance. After his meeting with Hayden and Negroponte, the facts appeared to Baquet too abstruse for an ordinary mind to digest. Yet a summary by Matthew Guariglia, at an unpretentious site called Heavy.com, made the necessary point in a short sentence yesterday: Klein had discovered “at AT&T, where he worked, that the NSA was installing surveillance rooms and equipment where they could monitor and copy internet traffic.” Markoff and Shane also made a comprehensible summary of the facts Baquet had found mysterious and perplexing. The story was this: the NSA installed at AT&T special surveillance rooms and equipment to capture everyday traffic on the internet. A source and a reporter told it; an editor in Los Angeles seemed to like it and then talked to two government officials and then killed it; an editor in New York found it newsworthy after all and printed it.
As usual, there is a second layer. Abramson, in the months before being sacked, had sought to hire as a second managing editor, alongside Baquet, the editor of the AmericanGuardian, Janine Gibson. Gibson’s sense of the public importance of secret surveillance, to judge by the evidence thus far, is of a different order from Baquet’s.
According to the version we are asked to believe, the initiative by Abramson to hire Gibson enraged Sulzberger and Baquet, because it amounted to an unauthorized reorganization of the managerial hierarchy. So far, so plausible. But was this about nothing but personal pique and a failure of proper consultation? Anyway Baquet is in command at the New York Times now — the paper that ran the NSA story which he killed at the Los Angeles Times — and if Abramson’s sacking was in no way related to her connection with the Snowden stories or a fear of controversy and harassment by government, this can be proved by the courage Baquet displays in following the NSA trail he once helped the government to obscure.


now real life untold story 

Malaysia Airlines appears to have played down reports that Rolls-Royce, the engine makers of the missing plane, may have received two sets of data on its whereabouts.
 Datuk Seri Hishammuddin Hussein has plonked himself in the captain’s seat of the MH370 operation to meet the expectations of passengers’ relatives, crews’ co-workers and others.Following instructions from the International Civil Aviation Organisation to put in place systems to pre-empt terror strikes on flights, an international airline last week tested its first Onboard Mind Reader (OMR) that records on board audio and integrates it with each passenger’s thoughts. To see the result, the airlines picked an OMR graph of a passenger, a certain Mr Vijayakanth, who was on board LS 543 last week from Singapore to Chennai. On what made them suspicious of the passenger, the airline said the man of dark complexion kept removing his goggles to roll his bloodshot eyes and grit his teeth every time the in-flight announcement introduced the pilot as ‘Captain’.
Here are excerpts from the OMR graph, with the passenger’s thoughts in italics:
Audio: We are cruising at 32,000 feet and the weather is just fine…
Vijayakanth: Oh, the political weather is anything but fine. In a couple of hours I will be in Chennai and have to answer reporters’ questions on electoral alliance. Whom do I go with? After that bitter lesson Amma taught me, should I be allying with anyone at all? But without a poll friend, I won’t get a single seat. Won’t it be nice if at least we win a seat? Oh, Premalatha, what’s it that you said about fantasising as an MP? Think I need a … err … soft drink. Waiter! Ayyo … what do you call that woman … yeah, airhostess…
Audio: Sir, may I help you?
Vijayakanth: No, you can’t. Nobody can. Not even Premalatha or Sudheesh are of much help now. Kalaignar seems to be too friendly, but should I extend my hand? With Amma on a roll, that alliance doesn’t seem promising. And then, why should I lose the ‘alternative’ tag which will help me in the 2016 Assembly elections? But can I sustain the party without the perks of power till then? Am I thirsty for power? Ah, am thirsty, for a drink, but not the heady stuff. I can ignore Dr Karunanidhi and Dr Jayalalithaa, but not my personal doctor’s advice. So, milk I will have.
Audio: Milk with a pinch of saffron, sir?
Vijayakanth: Now, don’t remind me of saffron. The BJP is eager to have me as an ally. And, if the damned pollsters are to be believed, Modi could well be the Prime Minister. There, do I see a cabinet berth for my better half? So if I go with someone, it has to be him. Oh God, I can resist everything but temptation—and a glass of chilled, well, milk with saffron.
Earlier this week the New Scientist revealed that one set of data tracked the plane after takeoff and a second recorded where it was during the climb towards Beijing. The data is from the Airborne Communications Addressing and Reporting System, or ACARS. It said:
The missing Malaysia Airlines jet sent at least two bursts of technical data back to the airline before it disappeared, New Scientist has learned.
To aid maintenance, most airlines use the Aircraft Communications Addressing and Reporting System (ACARS), which automatically collates and files four technical reports during every flight so that engineers can spot problems. These reports are sent via VHF radio or satellite at takeoff, during the climb, at some point while cruising, and on landing.”
Now Malaysia Airlines has told Sky News that the Roll-Royce engines stopped transmitting updates when the plane lost contact, according to its correspondent Mark Stone. He did not elaborate.
quoting unnamed investigators as saying that MH370 continued to send electronic signals after it lost contract with ground control. The Boeing 777 was equipped with a satellite-communication link “designed to automatically transmit the status of some onboard systems to the ground,” the Journal reports:
Investigators are still working to fully understand the information, according to one person briefed on the matter. The transmissions, this person said, were comparable to the plane “saying I’m here, I’m ready to send data.”
Here’s how Reuters explains the “pings”:
Communications satellites picked up faint electronic pulses from Malaysian Airlines Flight 370 after it went missing on Saturday, but the signals gave no indication about where the stray jet was heading nor its technical condition, a source close to the investigation said on Thursday.
The “pings” equated to an indication that the aircraft’s maintenance troubleshooting systems were ready to communicate with satellites if needed, but no links were opened because Malaysia Airlines and others had not subscribed to the full troubleshooting service, the source said.
The Wall Street Journal continues to build out its report, first published this morning, that the plane flew for hours after “disappearing.” See the subsequent post on this blog about an important correction the WSJ has appended to its initial report: the theory that the plane flew for hours was based not on a signal from a system inside the Rolls-Royce engines but on a signal from a separate satellite communication systems in the plane, the Journal says.



A jet like this: Here's a Boeing 777 Malaysia Airlines jet, with the registration number 9M-MRO, flying over Poland last month, on 5 February, 2014.
Hisham:
A jet like this: Here’s a Boeing 777 Malaysia Airlines jet, flew into the Twilight Zone Whatever onboard systems the plane may have automatically reported on after losing contact with ground control, the plane did not transmit data on the status of its engines after contact with ground control was lost, the Associated Press quotes an unnamed “US official” as saying.

AP quotes the official as saying a “digital datalink” sent information about the plane’s engines and “other information on the functioning of the plane” before contact was lost. But “there were no data transmitted on the status of a missing Malaysia Airlines jet’s engines after contact was lost with the plane,” the AP reports.MH370 Yet another news outlet has put the spotlight on missing jet pilot Captain Zaharie Ahmad Shah, this time, quoting a “high ranking” Malaysian police officer involved in the investigation.

The unnamed source in the USA Today report says there was no evidence of mechanical failure or hijacking, and Zaharie was the only one on board MH370 who could have made the “deliberate” turnings.

With so few facts available in the MH370 tragedy, the media has turned criminal investigators to answer the second big question in the most baffling mystery in modern aviation history: what happened on board the flight?

The first big question of where the plane is was answered on the night of last Monday (March 24) by Prime Minister Najib Abdul Razak, who told the world the flight “ended” in a remote area of the southern Indian Ocean, far from any possible landing site.

Najib’s other statements on the tragedy were on March 15, when he announced that new satellite information from the West opened the search for MH370 on two new corridors, a northern corridor stretching from the border of Kazakhstan and Turkmenistan to northern Thailand and, or a southern corridor stretching from Indonesia to the southern Indian Ocean.

Last Saturday, Najib announced that investigators had determined that whatever happened on board the plane was a deliberate act, likely by someone with advanced knowledge of the Boeing 777-200ER and commercial aviation.

With scant information available, media focus turned to scrutinise the lives of the pilot and co-pilot.

But for all the accusations levelled at Zaharie and co-pilot Fariq Abdul Hamid, nothing has turned up in background investigations to incriminated either of them.

Ex-MAS staff: Our pilots the best

A former Malaysia Airlines crew member, whose husband still works for the airline as a pilot, said wild theories and speculation flying around were “blurry and flawed”, and only made the tragic situation harder for the families of the crew members.

“While I don’t work with Malaysia Airlines anymore, I just need to say our pilots have always been the best.

“Our cabin crew overall are superb and dedicated. We have had good training and would even be prepared for unforeseen situations.”

Their job was a matter of intense responsibility, and crew members took great pride in their work, she said.

“So, I can never disregard the efforts of our crew, and in my heart I do believe this isn’t anything to do with the crew.

“Everywhere in the world there will be personal flaws but when it comes to work, it is responsibility, integrity, pride and our caring ways that we live by.”

Even though she has never flown with Zaharie or Fariq (left), both are considered family, she said.

“With the crew in Malaysia Airlines, we have always considered everyone flying as colleagues, for that is the way we are.

“We, the Malaysia Airlines crew, remain still as a family, as we have always been.”

Hisham: Consider all on board innocent until…

Malaysia’s Acting Transport Minister, Hishammuddin Hussein, has urged the people to consider all those on board innocent until proven otherwise, including the pilots.

The law operates on a presumption that anyone charged with a crime is innocent until proven guilty – because it is seen as better that 10 guilty men go free, rather than one innocent man suffers.

The same principle has not been afforded to the two men charged with the safety of the other 237 people on board flight MH370, who have undergone a trial-by-media over the last three weeks, with every aspect of their personal lives pored over in an effort to find a hint of something sinister.

With new radar data showing the plane crashed in the southern Indian Ocean, suggesting it flew until it ran out of fuel, some sort of mechanical failure has not been discounted by investigators as the reason one of the pilots redirected the plane from its planned route to Beijing.

Investigators may still turn up evidence of wrongdoing on the part of one of the crew members; but, equally, they may not.

Until then, it must be remembered, it is all too easy to accuse someone of something when they are not present to defend themselves.

And for the families of Zaharie and Fariq, they are burdened not only with the loss of a loved one, but the largely baseless accusation that their loved ones caused the anguish being suffered by 237 other families.MH370 Yet another news outlet has put the spotlight on missing jet pilot Captain Zaharie Ahmad Shah, this time, quoting a “high ranking” Malaysian police officer involved in the investigation.

The unnamed source in the USA Today report says there was no evidence of mechanical failure or hijacking, and Zaharie was the only one on board MH370 who could have made the “deliberate” turnings.

With so few facts available in the MH370 tragedy, the media has turned criminal investigators to answer the second big question in the most baffling mystery in modern aviation history: what happened on board the flight?

The first big question of where the plane is was answered on the night of last Monday (March 24) by Prime Minister Najib Abdul Razak, who told the world the flight “ended” in a remote area of the southern Indian Ocean, far from any possible landing site.

Najib’s other statements on the tragedy were on March 15, when he announced that new satellite information from the West opened the search for MH370 on two new corridors, a northern corridor stretching from the border of Kazakhstan and Turkmenistan to northern Thailand and, or a southern corridor stretching from Indonesia to the southern Indian Ocean.

Last Saturday, Najib announced that investigators had determined that whatever happened on board the plane was a deliberate act, likely by someone with advanced knowledge of the Boeing 777-200ER and commercial aviation.

With scant information available, media focus turned to scrutinise the lives of the pilot and co-pilot.

But for all the accusations levelled at Zaharie and co-pilot Fariq Abdul Hamid, nothing has turned up in background investigations to incriminated either of them.

Ex-MAS staff: Our pilots the best

A former Malaysia Airlines crew member, whose husband still works for the airline as a pilot, said wild theories and speculation flying around were “blurry and flawed”, and only made the tragic situation harder for the families of the crew members.

“While I don’t work with Malaysia Airlines anymore, I just need to say our pilots have always been the best.

“Our cabin crew overall are superb and dedicated. We have had good training and would even be prepared for unforeseen situations.”

Their job was a matter of intense responsibility, and crew members took great pride in their work, she said.

“So, I can never disregard the efforts of our crew, and in my heart I do believe this isn’t anything to do with the crew.

“Everywhere in the world there will be personal flaws but when it comes to work, it is responsibility, integrity, pride and our caring ways that we live by.”

Even though she has never flown with Zaharie or Fariq (left), both are considered family, she said.

“With the crew in Malaysia Airlines, we have always considered everyone flying as colleagues, for that is the way we are.

“We, the Malaysia Airlines crew, remain still as a family, as we have always been.”

Consider all on board innocent until…

Malaysia’s Acting Transport Minister, Hishammuddin Hussein, has urged the people to consider all those on board innocent until proven otherwise, including the pilots.

The law operates on a presumption that anyone charged with a crime is innocent until proven guilty – because it is seen as better that 10 guilty men go free, rather than one innocent man suffers.

The same principle has not been afforded to the two men charged with the safety of the other 237 people on board flight MH370, who have undergone a trial-by-media over the last three weeks, with every aspect of their personal lives pored over in an effort to find a hint of something sinister.

With new radar data showing the plane crashed in the southern Indian Ocean, suggesting it flew until it ran out of fuel, some sort of mechanical failure has not been discounted by investigators as the reason one of the pilots redirected the plane from its planned route to Beijing.

Investigators may still turn up evidence of wrongdoing on the part of one of the crew members; but, equally, they may not.

Until then, it must be remembered, it is all too easy to accuse someone of something when they are not present to defend themselves.

And for the families of Zaharie and Fariq, they are burdened not only with the loss of a loved one, but the largely baseless accusation that their loved ones caused the anguish being suffered by 237 other families.

Chinese nationals made up more than two-thirds of the 227 passengers on board missing flight MH370. Relatives and citizens in China have lashed out at Malaysia's handling of the crisis, accusing Putrajaya of withholding information on the missing plane. – The Malaysian Insider pic, March 28, 2014.

most important websites, newspapers, and broadcast news organizations, together with numbers for website traffic, circulation and audience.
The numbers are guesstimates based on media reports, listed companies’ public filings, media advertising rate cards, Alexa.com and Danwei interviews with media insiders. Like all numbers in China, they should be taken with a pinch of salt, for reference only. This list is updated every three months.
The major changes since the last version of this report (published in November 2013) are continued growth of Internet users, and the rise of the mobile device as the most common means of accessing the Internet:
“The number of Internet users in China had hit 604 million as of the end of September [2013], with mobile phones becoming the favored means of accessing the web, the State Internet Information Office announced”according to the China Daily.
2013 also witnessed a significant downturn of activity on Sina Weibo (often glossed as “China’s Twitter”). According to recent reports released by China Internet Network Information Center, 22.8% netizens reduced their usage of Weibo, including visits from mobile devices. In December 2013, there were 196 million mobile phone Weibo users, which is 5.96 million fewer than at the end of 2012. The decline is widely blamed on several factors, including the rise of Tencent’s WeChat messaging and mobile app service; government censorship, especially the”Big V Crackdown”; too much advertising and commercial “noise” on users’ Weibo feeds; and a lack of innovation from Sina (see this article for more on the factors behind the decline).
There needs to be a closure for the families and friends of those who boarded MH 370 and one hopes that the search efforts are conclusive, however tragic that conclusion may be. The Chinese and Australian search planes have reported sighting debris. White floating objects and strapping belts have been reportedly spotted. Satellites have captured larger images. Yet, there is difficulty in pinning any of these to MH 370. If the plane crashed due to mechanical failure, then the pilot was but doing his job heroically, till the last. The bottom line is, nobody has any idea what went wrong with the plane and who did what to that ill-fated plane. Will the plane ever be found? Nobody knows. In today’s digitally advanced times, one thing is clear, man does not know it all and its time to trim Ahmad Zahid  arrogance factor.

“It took us what 100 years to find the Titanic,” he said. Ok. Good point. Let’s not lose hope. “It took us 2,000 years to find Noah’s Ark.” Wait. Hang on. Chinese netizens are demanding economic and military sanctions against Malaysia for not sharing information about the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 in a timely manner. During an interview with aviation attorney Salvatore Lagonia, Hemmer speculated that it might take some time to find the missing jet. “If the Malaysian government discovered that the plane was brought down by an anti-government captain, they would die rather than admit the fact. The legitimacy of the country and its national image would never recover!” It is possible that the sudden decompression blew out the transponders and vital communication links. The possible decompression led to oxygen deprivation which rendered both the crew and the passengers to pass out while the plane literally kept flying for several hours until it ran out of fuel and crashed into the deep Indian ocean. These jets can glide for sometime even after fuel runs out and engines fail, the 777 ER could have made a neat entry into the ocean and now probably sits on the sea bed somewhere, who knows. It makes sense at this time to pay a bit of attention to a directive issued by FAA late last year. SUMMARY: We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain The Boeing Company Model 777 airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by a report of cracking in the fuselage skin underneath the satellite communication (SATCOM) antenna adapter. This proposed AD would require repetitive inspections of the visible fuselage skin and doubler if installed, for cracking, corrosion, and any indication of contact of a certain fastener to a bonding jumper, and repair if necessary. We are proposing this AD to detect and correct cracking and corrosion in the fuselage skin, which could lead to rapid decompression and loss of structural integrity of the airplane.



Chinese military shipbuilding continues steadily. Evidence of China’s first indigenous carrier hull may emerge even as its first foreign-purchased hull,

“China should sanction Malaysia to force the truth out of them,” wrote Zhang Kai, a lawyer in Zhejiang province, in his account on Weibo, Chinese version of Twitter. “Malaysia should be completely honest and release everything they know,” another blogger wrote. “Otherwise China should slap them with sanctions and take military actions if necessary.” Many Chinese believe the crew of the Malaysian airplane was responsible for its disappearance, and Kuala Lumpur was trying to hide this information by giving false leads. A stream of posts on micro blogs are asking if Kuala Lumpur has something to hide, and why it had been releasing information about radar sightings and technical matters in drips over the past two weeks.

A Shanghai-based blogger wrote: “If the Malaysian government discovered that the plane was brought down by an anti-government captain, they would die rather than admit the fact. The legitimacy of the country and its national image would never recover!”

Frustration over the two-week long futile searches for remnants of the airplane has even resulted in some criticism of the Chinese government.

“What if those 153 Chinese nationals had been Americans?” a blogger named Chinese Talmud asked. “I sincerely believe that the American government would mobilize the entire country, turn the world upside down and scour every corner of the earth until that plane is found,” he said. Two third of the 329 people on the missing flight are Chinese nationals.

The state-controlled media also reflected the general frustration over the searches with both China Daily and Global Times questioning the tardy information release by Malaysian officials. Global Times has accused Malaysia of supplying unreliable information that resulted in massive loss of time and resources of several countries.

Kuala Lumpur claimed it had been withholding information that’s not “verified by the international investigations team.” readmore http://themalaybusinesstribune.blogspot.com/2014/03/najib-under-fire-from-chinese-netizens.html
A passenger airplane with 239 people vanishes into a dark night, leaving the world mystified and horrified. A resurgent superpower swallows a territory it ceded to a neighbour, causing tension around the globe. Voters in democracy are so disgusted with the two political principals that they look to 50 year-old party  no governing experience for salvation. The MH370 mystery is probably the most baffling one to solve in aviation history. With more than 26 countries going around in circles to determine the fate of the 777 jet, it has opened more possibilities, theories, wild guesses than ringing in any form of conclusions. Every day there is a new tangent in which the case seems to be diverting itself into. The expanse of the possibility theory is as much as the search area in the deep Indian Ocean that the Chinese, the Australian and the French teams are scouring. They are trying to find a needle in an Ocean. The latest twist to the MH370 saga has been an unidentified call from a mystery woman made to the Captain of MH370 using a sim purchased with a fake address. The sightings in the dark and dire swirling waters have not led to anything concrete. Our hearts go out to the passengers, the crew, their families and friends even as wild theories of hijack and suicide float in an ocean of mystery.

With emotions still running high among families of the Chinese passengers of the ill-fated Malaysia Airlines flight MH370, Home Minister Datuk Seri Ahmad Zahid Hamidi pic) has laid the blame on the Chinese print media for “stoking the anger” of the victims’ families, especially those from China.
“The prime minister and acting transport minister have tried their best to resolve this but, unfortunately, the papers have manipulated this and played up the sentiments until the families, especially those from Beijing, are upset.
“This is an accident which no one wants to see happen,” Zahid said when winding up the King’s royal address in Parliament tonight.But, there are so many questions that remain unanswered in trying to solve this aviation riddle of gargantuan proportions. First of, in today’s digital day and age is it possible for a 777 200 ER with a wing span of almost 200 feet and 209 feet in length vanish without a trace? Yes. MH 370 has proven exactly this. What is more perplexing is the conflicting news that came in the first few days after its disappearance about its supposed route after last contact, thereby resulting in search teams scouring what is now deemed to be the ‘wrong’ sea. The South China Sea in this instance. Second, there is an indication that the transponders have been purposely switched off. This naturally raises another question, why should there even be a provision to switch off these transponders and the ACARS manually? After all, is it not these very systems that would be the most vital link between the plane and land in case of things going dastardly out of whack aboard the plane? Why would one make it even manually possible to turn it off? History proves it is the only reliable link given that the satellite pings received several hours after take off have been rather inscrutable in determining the plane’s exact position at the time of the last ping. Third, assuming that a non-crew member hijacked the plane, how did this person get access to the cockpit? If this was a crewmember, then where both the pilots in collusion with one another given that there were no ‘alarms’ raised at any point by either one. What about the other crewmembers? Assuming that nobody besides the pilot / pilots were involved, was it impossible for the other crew members to raise any form of alarm? Or was there no realization until it was too late of the supposed hijack? The scheduled flight between Kuala Lumpur and Beijing was 5 hours 49 minutes, the last ping was received approximately 7 hours 30 minutes after take off, after the plane had overshot it’s scheduled flying time did the cabin crew not notice anything amiss and try to raise any alarm? There was no availability of the CAN aeromobile network on this particular flight, so it would have been virtually impossible for passengers and cabin crew to use the airline’s network. Fresh reports coming in now indicate that the plane dropped from an altitude of 35,000 feet to 12,000 feet after making a sudden turn, albeit it is still unclear how long it took for the plane to descend to this height. This is a vital clue. Was there a mechanical problem that led to this descent that was tracked by military radar? Dailymail reported– ‘Radar tracking shows the aircraft changed altitude after making the ‘intentional’ sharp left turn as it headed toward the Strait of Malacca, a source close to the investigation said.The anonymous official, who is not authorized to speak to the media, told CNN that flying at 12,000 feet in the heavily trafficked air corridor would’ve kept the missing jet out of sight of other aircraft. Mary Schiavo, an aviation analyst and former inspector general for the U.S. Department of Transportation, told the international broadcaster the new information was ‘highly significant’. She said: ‘It explains so many pieces that didn’t fit together before.‘ Now, if we have a scenario where something happened, the plane made a dramatic turn and dropped from 35,000 feet to 12,000 feet, this scenario would fit what a pilot would do in the event of a catastrophic on-board event, such as a rapid decompression, a fire, an explosion.‘That’s what you would have to do, descend, get down and turn around and try to get back to an airport that could accommodate an ailing plane.’Just as I conclude this blog, news trickles in that the Malaysian Prime Minister has issued a

 

 

 

 

“We are taking matters into our own hands,” said Sarah Bajc, a US citizen whose partner Philip Wood was on the flight, told USA Today.

“There is no credible evidence” the plane is in the southern Indian Ocean, where planes, boats and a mini-sub have searched in vain for weeks.

“I’m convinced that somebody is concealing something,” said Bajc, 48, a business studies teacher in Beijing and former executive with Microsoft.

The campaign called “Reward MH370: The Search for the Truth” will be launchedMonday on crowd-sourcing website Indiegogo, with a minimum donation of US$5.

USA Today quoted Bajc as saying the relatives got permission from Indiegogo to raise money for a reward, which the firm had previously not permitted.

The campaign will hire a professional company licensed to operate in multiple countries, which according to Bajc, will be working on areas such as securing court orders to pull cellphone tower records from underneath the flight path.

USA Today quoted Bajc that the campaign is an initiative of family members from the USA, Australia, New Zealand, France and India, and does not involve relatives of passengers from China or Malaysia, whose citizens formed the majority of passengers on the flight.

“Granted, US$2 million in investigation services won’t go very far,” Bajc said. “Clearly, they’ve already spent US$100 million dollars and they’ve gotten nothing. But we’re not going to approach it with boats in the ocean, we’re going to approach it with human intelligence.”

She told USA Today that potential donors should understand “there are no promises here, but we believe we need to try something, as if we just sit back on our heels and allow the existing path to continue, I don’t think this will ever be solved.”

Australian transportation authorities, who are leading the official search, yesterday said it will hire a specialist company to begin a renewed underwater search in a revised search zone in August.

A Chinese ship is conducting underwater mapping of the ocean floor to assist the later search. The US Navy’s mini-sub Bluefin-21 is no longer being used.

“If there was any evidence that that plane was wrecked in the water, even a seat cushion, I would be taking a totally different approach,” Bajc said.

“But there’s been nothing.” The relatives are inspired by the example of family members after the 2009 crash of an Air France plane, which was located after two years.

“Air France was also declared unsolvable and un-findable. Family members got together and insisted the search be kept alive,” she said. –

– See more at: http://www.themalaysianinsider.com/malaysia/article/families-turn-to-crowdsourced-detectives-whistle-blowers-for-mh370-answers#sthash.QePMTjIx.dpuf

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