Mohd BIN Katir ALI(GEPIMA) son MARRIED FOR DOWRY AND ABANDON and DIVORCED his WIFE

 

 THIS IS THE PICTURE 

MALBARI BASTARD  

PERGERAKAN BELlA INDIA

MUSLIM MALAYSIA (GEPIMA)

* MOHD BIN KATHER ALl

012-3136250 / 03-40417445

 

Ada lagi satu benda yang agak menarik untuk diberitahu. Saya bgtau kat mereka, ramai juga yg emailkan kepada indiamuslim.com.my, minta pelbagai jenis bantuan. Ada yang minta bantuan warga indiamuslim dalam persekolahan, tidak ada duit, mak sakit, ayah tidak bekerja, tak dapat sara diri dan sebagainya. Dengan segera sorang wakil KIMMA katakan ” itu semua bagi kat GEPIMA” KIMMA susah nak settlekan benda2 ni…saya taktahu ayat tersebut keluar dgn nada sindir atau betul2, tapi agak terkejut juga time tu. Saya katakan, dulu kalau ade email-email seperti ini saya terus bagi number phone orang KIMMA. Tapi takpa…lepas ni maybe takleh bagi kat KIMMA benda2 bantuan macam ni….orang2 indiamuslim yang ade masalah2 macam ni…try contact orang GEPIMA sebab nampak macam KIMMA bagi certificate ni….hehe3…:P

Perkara2 lain yang dibincangkan tidaklah begitu serius. Banyak berkenaan internal conflict yang berlaku diantara KIMMA & Indiamuslim.com.my.Antaranya tentang kepercayaan yang diberikan, isu fitnah dan sebagainya. Semuanya dah settle, tapi ada 1 – 2 isu internal yang tak settle disebabkan orang yang difitnah tersebut tidak dapat hadir ke meeting tersebut. Sebenarnya tidak patut utk saya bgtau dlm post ni…tapi sedang saya type ni, arejug baru call katakan problem ni masih tak settle…tergerak hati utk bgtau kat sini agar masalah tersebut dapat disettlekan secepat mungkin sebab saya pun dah bagitahu depan2 dgn Pemuda KIMMA ni last week, sampai ke harini dia masih tak settlekan. Memang time dalam meeting kata semua benda boleh bincang…boleh settlekan..call sahaja..boleh settle…bla3…

Abdul Razak A.K.A arejug telah banyak kali memberitahu saya, Pemuda KIMMA (abg amir hamzah) ni fitnah dia macam2. Kata dia ni pro MALBARI….buat aktiviti2 semua untuk malbari ….arejug ni tak suka indiamuslim..dan sebagainya. Time jumpa dgn abg amir hamzah arituh, saya ada bgtau dia. Arejug call dia berkali-kali tapi dia tak jawap. Call arejug secepat mungkin untuk menyelesaikan masalah tapi sampai kesaat saya buat post ni, dia tak call2. Memang perkara ini agak remeh, tapi ini berkaitan kredibiliti arejug dan indiamuslim.com.my yang dibawah jagaan beliau. Arejug kata benda ni tersebar luas dan menyebabkan beliau agak tertekan dengan orang KIMMA. Jadi saya nasihatkan cepat2 call arejug utk menyelesaikan masalah2 internal diantara “Pemuda KIMMA” dgn arejug ( indiamuslim.com.my) Utk makluman, arejug banyak habiskan masa beliau untuk aktiviti2 masyarakat indiamuslim selama ini. Sekarang pun masih aktif, cuba agak kurang disebabkan komitmen kerja dan sebagainya. Tapi sentiasa update!!!Memang tak patut keluarkan statement2 yang dapat menjatuhkan kredibiliti beliau sebagai seorang pemimpin. Settlekan secepat mungkinlah 

STOP MEDDLING INTO OUR AFFAIR AND THE CALL COME FROM

 this fight will go on

stop meddling into our affair and the call come from PERMIM, GEPIMA ubaidi foundation, who do this NGOs represents? WHY WE HAVE NO TIME, ASK YOURSELF WHY?

MY HUMBLE APPEAL TO ALLIndianMuslimS, ASK YOUR SOUL AND COMENT, WHAT IS PUT BEFORE U . IT IS FOR OUR GRAND CHILDREN AND ON THE FUTURE GENERATION.DONT BE MISLEAD BY THE TINEST OF THE MINORITY WHO HAVE VESTED INTERST TO RIDE ROUGHSHOT OVER THE MAJORITY, HOW DANGEROUSLY THEY TWISTED

THE MACHIAVELLIAN MACHINATION.THE POLITICAL CLIMATE IS CHANGING VERY FAST THIS IS RIGHT TIME FOR US TO UNITE TO TELL THEM being the underdog or written off as the second choice can be a liberating experience. It means being brave to take chances and introduce changes and reforms which others paralysed by the constant worry of upsetting their popularity ratings, are loath to touch.

run by people committed to reviving time-tested methods of educating and transforming human beings. It is our belief that Islam offers a cohesive understanding of the world and a praxis for it that is able to cut through the illusion of contemporary nihilism and materialism.

We recognize ignorance as the greatest weapon of the dark forces working in the world and believe that the light of true knowledge is the only weapon to dispel that darkness. This is our struggle, and our efforts are directed at spreading the light and wisdom of prophetic truths everywhere and to all peoples. Our aim is to teach the tools individuals need in order to live lives of guidance and adherence to sacred order and to restore broad-based pluralistic and true scholarship to its proper place as a first priority of Muslims.

We believe the problems facing this generation are those very problems mentioned in our Prophet’s final sermon, upon him be prayers and peace: economic injustice, racism, the oppression of women, and the manipulation of natural order. We believe these human illnesses can only be treated through healing the hearts of humanity with spiritual truths of the impermanence of the world and the need to understand our purpose while we are here and act accordingly. This can only be done with sound and true knowledge. It is our goal to acquire and disseminate that knowledge

run by people committed to reviving time-tested methods of educating and transforming human beings. It is our belief that Islam offers a cohesive understanding of the world and a praxis for it that is able to cut through the illusion of contemporary nihilism and materialism.We recognize ignorance as the greatest weapon of the dark forces working in the world and believe that the light of true knowledge is the only weapon to dispel that darkness. This is our struggle, and our efforts are directed at spreading the light and wisdom of prophetic truths everywhere and to all peoples. Our aim is to teach the tools individuals need in order to live lives of guidance and adherence to sacred order and to restore broad-based pluralistic and true scholarship to its proper place as a first priority of Muslims.We believe the problems facing this generation are those very problems mentioned in our Prophet’s final sermon, upon him be prayers and peace: economic injustice, racism, the oppression of women, and the manipulation of natural order. We believe these human illnesses can only be treated through healing the hearts of humanity with spiritual truths of the impermanence of the world and the need to understand our purpose while we are here and act accordingly. This can only be done with sound and true knowledge. It is our goal to acquire and disseminate that knowledge

THIS TAXIDRIVER APPROACH HISHAMUDDIN OF THE UBAIDI FOUNDATION AFTER BEING SHUTOUT BY PERMIN’S SYED IBRAHIM

TO GET SPONSERSHIP FOR FIRST CONVENTION FOR INDIAN MUSLIM WOMAN

AFTER WAITNG THREE MONTHS FOR THE APPOINTMENT HE SMS ME FOR THE APPOINTMENT AND HE AGREED TO SPONSER THE CONVENTION, ASK ME TO GO AHEAD WITH THE PREPATION. HE DID NOT TELL ME THEN THAT HIS UBAIDI FOUNDATION WILL ONLY FUND REGISTERED BODY AND IN OPERATION FOR 5YEARS NOW HE TELLING ME THIS AFTER I EXPOSED

Hope and resilience are good but has its limits we can’t sort of dictate them but rather inspire and mentor. Everyone processes difficult experiences in various ways.Are Indian Muslim armchair philanthropists aware of the plight of 24-year old Siti Nazrin binte Mohd Iqbal?

If you cannot help dont stop others from helping them

MALAYSIAN INDIAN NGO’S to , NOT aware of the plight of INDIAN MUSLIM women. With a blend of research, personal relationships, and relevant narratives, muslimah journal@MALAYSIA has a deep understanding of the injustices occurring in Malaysia, and an even deeper desire to educate others on the issues they are so passionate about. We have failed to even investigate torturers,YET THIS SO CALLED ‘armchair philanthropist’ is protecting

ThIS PREDATOR

at times like a journal, filled with anecdotes from those they’ve met along the way. Though every so often the solutions they offer may come across as patronizing or the stories they present as anomalies, I believe the journal is a step in the right direction, openly discuss taboo topics, some which have not been presented in this magnitude before. Bringing issues to light is the first step in real change, and facing discomfort head on is precisely what they do. They posit a general framework of what is happening, what has been done, and most importantly, what needs to happen to drive change

at the very least 24-year old Siti Nazrin binte Mohd Iqbal had filed a complaint against her in-law Mohd BIN Katir ALI(GEPIMA) for torturing her for more dowry, Siti’s father has given 800gms of gold valued at RM95,OOO. They still tortured me fron day one I enter their house. Mental and physical torture by Mohd bin Katir ALI and his family for more dowry of RM100,000 in cash to buy a bunglow in Taman Rawther. MOHD son had only primary six , assaulted with hot iron,forced her to sleep in the storeroom and was fed with left over food.a withness tipped her father how she was forced to housework for the family of 12 people during the time she was pregnant they continue to torture her, her former husband and his mother pressed her baby while she was carring ,they kill my baby cried . They are supposed to bear half the cost of the wedding but they tricked my father to agree for the full cost of the wedding mohd even demanded rm 2000 commision from the caterer the catering was fully paid by my father what kind vulture is this man yet the so called

MOHD BIN KATIR ALI is the one who ended the relationship.He always remind me if i complain to my parents he will end our relationship me one day to announce, “It’s over.”ask his son , I got a piece of mail, which my husband had signed with the three words “Talaq, talaq, talaq,” meaning “I divorce you, I divorce you, I divorce you.” According to traditional interpretation, a Muslim man has to simply utter this word three times to divorce his wife While these situations are becoming in Malaysia among INDIANMUSLIMS, they still occur often enough to warrant some discussion on them. There are those families who will use the bride’s dowry as their own. Often in these situations, the bride’s dowry will be recycled for the groom’s sisters’ dowry. Sometimes, the groom’s family uses the bride’s dowry entirely for their own means and the bride does not benefit from it all. There have been horrible, true stories of the groom’s family agreeing to one dowry and after the bride is married (and I might add, no longer a virgin) demanding more from the bride’s parents. Threats of divorce are often used to entice the bride’s parents to give more dowry. In a country where shame is brought down on the divorcee, parents of the bride will do whatever they can to save their daughters this shame. Occasionally, the threat of physical violence is used. There really is no way these type situations can end happily. Even if the bride’s parents are able to scrape together more dowry, they will not be able to continue doing so and in the end the bride is either sent home in shame or sometimes killed in an “accident”.

Often people do not realize the dowry system has repercussions in many different areas other than the obvious horrible one stated above. Given the fact that a girl’s parents must provide a substantial dowry plus try to give her a college education or some form of formal education today, it is not surprising that the number of girl abortions are extremely high in India. Interestingly, India theoretically is a culture which places high value on females. The females of a family are the life-blood, the pride and honor of that family. It is a very contradictory situation to see such importance placed on females and then to see the abortion rates of female babies sky high. Most college-educated Indians I have spoken to, both male and female, stand in firm objection to the dowry system and see that the twisted form it has taken is responsible for the degradation of women. In these families, girl children are just as prized as boy children and parents are teaching their daughters of their own worth as a human being.

they still occur often enough to warrant some discussion on them. There are those families who will use the bride’s dowry as their own. Often in these situations, the bride’s dowry will be recycled for the groom’s sisters’ dowry. Sometimes, the groom’s family uses the bride’s dowry entirely for their own means and the bride does not benefit from it all. There have been horrible, true stories of the groom’s family agreeing to one dowry and after the bride is married (and I might add, no longer a virgin) demanding more from the bride’s parents. Threats of divorce are often used to entice the bride’s parents to give more dowry. In a country where shame is brought down on the divorcee, parents of the bride will do whatever they can to save their daughters this shame. Occasionally, the threat of physical violence is used. There really is no way these type situations can end happily. Even if the bride’s parents are able to scrape together more dowry, they will not be able to continue doing so and in the end the bride is either sent home in shame or sometimes killed in an “accident”.

Often people do not realize the dowry system has repercussions in many different areas other than the obvious horrible one stated above. Given the fact that a girl’s parents must provide a substantial dowry plus try to give her a college education or some form of formal education today, it is not surprising that the number of girl abortions are extremely high in India. Interestingly, India theoretically is a culture which places high value on females. The females of a family are the life-blood, the pride and honor of that family. It is a very contradictory situation to see such importance placed on females and then to see the abortion rates of female babies sky high. Most college-educated Indians I have spoken to, both male and female, stand in firm objection to the dowry system and see that the twisted form it has taken is responsible for the degradation of women. In these families, girl children are just as prized as boy children and parents are teaching their daughters of their own worth as a human being.

HOW SITI NAZRIN WAS TORTURED BY GEPIMA MOHD.WHEN SITI’S FATHER ASKED HISHAMUDDIN’S HELP TO GET the BACK GOLDs valued at RM95,OOO given to her by her father which Gepima’s Mohd family stole fron siti Nazrin,Hishamuddin

TOLD SITI’S FATHER MOHAMAD IQBALTHAT HE CANT HELP BEING A PERSONAL MATTER.BUT NOW WHY IS HE BACKING OUT THIS CONVENTION HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH GEPIMA MOHD

Drawing parallels to the story in the Quran which related how Prophet Muhammad engineered the opening of Mecca to Muslims through the Treaty of Hudaibiyyah, this taxidriver pointed out that change did not happen overnight.

“The success that was achieved certainly did not happen in the blink of an eye. Two years before the Opening of Mecca, a treaty known as Hudaibiyyah was sealed between Rasulullah S.A.W. and the Quraisy clan.

“None doubted the treatise. Yet clearly there were advantages behind the readiness and patience of Rasulullah S.A.W. in accepting the contract…As soon as the Treaty of Hudaibiyyah was sealed, Allah issued a commandment:

‘Truly, for your struggle (O Muhammad) We have opened a path to victory that is clearly to be seen,’”this taxidriver highlighted.

“The change that we desire to implement is based on solid blocks of stones, a distant cry from the empty rhetoric based on hate and dispute,” he said.

He added: “We must ensure that this INDIAN MUSLIM is not swallowed up by the fires of partisanship and sunk with reckless dogmatism. Remember ‘who sows the wind will reap a hurricane’.”

“The Contemporary Muslim Woman” featuring diverse Muslim women writers from around the world discussing a gamut of topics in their own unique, honest and eclectic voices.Breaking a Stalemate ZEBA IQBALMy sincere request to the Muslim American community, namely eligible men and their mothers, matrimonial sites and event organizers, and rishta aunties everywhere: ‘Please stop ignoring me, and many others like me. I am part of a growing population of single women over 35 in our community, and we are not going away.’We’ve reached a stalemate on marriage (probably several years ago) and have been on opposite sides of the table for too long. Can we be allies, not enemies? No one’s right. No one’s wrong. Can we call a truce and move on?Though not widely discussed beyond the living rooms of Muslim American families, we all know marriage is a high priority (to be clear ‘wajib’ not ‘fardh’). Being unmarried and over 35, I know searching for a suitable mate also includes a lot of soul searching (example: “Why is this happening Allah, what have I/we done wrong?’ accompanied by muffled sobs and tears, and of course chest beating).Growing up on romance novels and romantic movies, we (women) are not averse to marriage. Before you say ‘tauba’ too many times many of the ‘romantic movies’ are Bollywood movies our parents ‘wished we would watch’ so that we would stay ‘connected with our culture’. Culture is a double-edged sword I guess.I believe we all need help. We need to take this discussion out of our living rooms to Muslim social scientists, our prominent imams and our community leaders. We need to do research, ask for their expertise and assistance. You think I’m joking. I’m not. This situation is not something we can address effectively without deep Islamic knowledge and strong data.I honestly do not believe I am ‘incapable’ of finding a ‘suitable match’, or that I am too old to have children, too picky, too ambitious, can’t cook or placing too much focus on my career. Yet this is what I have heard for the better part of 10 years.Let’s move beyond these circular discussions. I truly appreciate any and all efforts, but I am not big on ‘cookie cutter’ solutions where the focus is on culture, not religion. Why are we re-enforcing failed cultural paradigms and not creating a religious paradigm for our community?I have pep-talked my single friends out of some rough times (I’ve been there too), and know that ‘I’m younger today than I will be tomorrow’, I am ‘Allah’s creation and Allah’s creations are all beautiful’. More importantly, the Prophet Mohammed (PBUH) married women that were older/younger, thinner/fatter, darker/lighter, taller/shorter, stronger/weaker, etc. Except for Bibi Khadija, none of his wives had children, and yet they were the ‘best of women’.Marriage is a fortress, it is a protection for men and women, and is not only for procreation. Also, wealth and children are gifts from Allah, we cannot guarantee either of them. We forget these things when we get wrapped up so tightly in our social and cultural norms.I am ‘unlucky in love’ at least partly because I am working against a system, a mindset, with little to no support outside of a tight network of family and friends. Meeting and speaking with qualified, eligible men in informal and varied settings without going bankrupt and losing all my pride is a tough, if not impossible, proposition. You shake your head, but I speak the truth.Informal and Varied SettingsAsk any relatively normal and well-adjusted person who does not stick out like a sore thumb in any other aspect of life except their ‘unmarried’ state and you will know that matrimonial events and sites focus on age, height, income and location. Not always to be discriminatory, but more because they are the ‘easiest ways’ to pre-screen and categorize.These settings are awkward and uncomfortable at best, especially for outliers (women over 35) and most men. Women over 35 are often asked to sit in corners of the room or are ‘screened out’ of internet searches. We often convince other women to keep us company, but convincing men (our friends or people ‘like us) is tough, if not impossible.Informal professional networking events and sites in ‘halal’ settings are a better option, but they don’t target (or want to target) only marriage-minded singles. Their goal isn’t (and shouldn’t be) marriage.Going BankruptWe were always taught to be prudent, but internet site subscriptions add up ($20-30 each per month on Shaadi, Shadi, Match, eHarmony, etc) as do matrimonial events ~$100 each excluding clothes, make-up, hair and travel.After paying dearly for these, I have stopped both. With the former, it was the numerous photo-less two-line bios (example: ‘Were r u luv of my life? I am waitin my hole life for u. I bad with writting about myself. If u want to know me more please call or txt to me.’) and communicating with ‘lonelyinluv’s, ‘lookinforu’s, receiving email marriage proposels from ‘juscantwait’s and jpgs of roses from ‘luvofmylife’s. I decided, country song titles were not my thing. With the latter, no men, but I have made enough wonderful girlfriends to last me a lifetime.Rishta aunties, well, they do pass on my cell phone number to people (without informing me). I recently got a call from a man who had been sent by one. I spoke to him, but after responding to my query ‘so you’re divorced, do you have children’ with ‘kind of, do you like men who have children or not?’ I politely got off the phone and did du’a not to receive such calls anymore. Some pre-screening please!We spend freely because absent other options, the rationale is ‘OK these efforts are expensive, but —- true love: priceless!’. I am half-kidding, but in all seriousness, if there was more promise in any of these options, I would gladly keep paying, despite the economic crisis.PrideNeed I say more? Suffice it to say, this search for the ever elusive ‘suitable match’ has been a humbling experienceI have said my peace, and really do want to crack this egg, if not for me, for others – now and in the future. We can change this situation, InshAllah, but not without honest discussion. Life is too short to waste in a stalemate.

One in four women will experience domestic violence in her lifetime.Many American Muslim women endorse the same public-private distinction found in the Muslim world, but where can these women turn to develop and explore their sexuality here in America? Given the growing trend to abolish personal boundaries with ever-invasive social media and the holistic integration of the sexes, there is an essential lack of established women-only spaces for American Muslim women. To qualify, I am not condoning or celebrating forced gender segregation. In fact, the idea of Muslim women’s sexuality thriving in private is not a phenomenon exclusive to countries that impose strict gender segregation. Both Naomi Wolf and Fatima Mernissi have written about the vibrant, private sexuality of the women of Jordan, Egypt, and Morocco – all countries where women enjoy relative freedom of mobility. From their accounts, I deduce that this sexuality exists away from the public eye at least in part because these women choose to keep sexuality alive and healthy where it is considered most appropriate – in private.

These private spaces are distinct from what many American Muslim women often think of when they hear the words “female-only spaces;” I am not talking about women’s sections in mosques. In fact, I believe that the full partitioning off of the sexes in religious centers promotes unhealthy gender relations and prevents women from becoming functioning members of our religious community. The private spaces referred to in this article are instead institutionalized social spaces in which women are free to explore all aspects of their identity – defining their sexuality as part and parcel of their vulnerability and even spirituality. And, as a further note of clarification, these private spaces are not the over-sexualized harems that often show up in Hollywood movies; they are places where women can form an identity, embrace the beauty of being a woman without feeling pressured to starve their way to a size zero, learn from and support one another, and flourish among other women.

Without the appropriate private spaces to develop their sexuality, women are notably at risk because female sexuality can easily transform from a source of a woman’s power to a source of emotional weakness. Here in America, the pervasiveness of blatant, public sexuality has resulted in female sexuality becoming incredibly accessible and attainable. With no shortage of supply, American men are now able to dictate the terms of their access to female sexuality. One such example is the rise of casual sex – an incredibly male-centric view of sex and pleasure, especially given that women are predisposed to suffer more emotionally from casual sex because of the higher amounts of oxytocin, a bonding hormone, that they release during physical intimacy. “Women are still more vulnerable than men, and while many women have embraced a casual sex ethic, they often express regret after engaging in casual sex.” Yet more and more American women have accepted casual sex as an appropriate channeling of their sexuality because, with the mystery and allure of female sexuality severely muted by the public nature of American sex, women have lost the sexual advantage and men’s sexual ideals now dominate sexual practices. While in the Muslim world, men are so aware of the power of female sexuality that they, according to Mernissi, possess a palpable fear of being abandoned by their women, it seems that women in America are taught to tiptoe around the idea of commitment out of fear that their men will leave them for greener, less constricting pastures.

The male-centric sexual mores that dominate American society have particularly negative consequences for American Muslim women, for whom casual sex and casual relationships with men are usually not an option. For these women – both those with and without hijab – the choice not to expose their sexuality in public spaces can have painful consequences as they are easily overlooked by American Muslim men as being too cold and rigid to be approached. If the Muslim world understands the absence of public female sexuality as testimony to its vibrant presence in private spaces, in American Muslim communities this absence is often seen as testament to the fact that American Muslim women’s sexuality does not exist at all. Furthermore, without easy access to female sexuality, men of the Muslim world are motivated to pursue what lies hidden behind the public-private divide according to the terms dictated by the women they pursue. But here in America, American Muslim men no longer have to jump through hoops for women’s affection and can afford to be distracted by the sexiness abound.

Even when an American Muslim woman is able to find a mate, the gnawing feeling of once being sexually undesired and the accompanying unfamiliarity with being a sexual being in private spaces can lead to difficulties in marriage. When a woman is not familiar with the power of her sexuality, being thrust into the murky waters of marriage, commitment and family can leave her desperately trying to stay afloat. While women in the Muslim world seem to be considerably attuned to the art of using their sexuality to keep a marriage healthy, here in America, Muslim women lack access to the same collective knowledge bases and seem naïve as to the secrets of womanhood and intimate relationships. Growing up in the west, it is hard not to internalize the Orientalist notion that we are the ones who export progress to the Muslim world, but I wonder if in this instance, when it comes to learning about the power of female sexuality and the importance of developing and harnessing it in private spaces, we Americans might this time take our cue from the other side of the world

Mona Sheikh

Re-reading Islamic textual sources is not the simple answer to patriarchal interpretations and practices among Muslims. The answer is beyond that of gender and linguistics. It is more fundamentally about broadening our concepts of religion and revelation. Muslim women should take the lead challenging narrow ideas about who has “religious” authority.

From the viewpoint of many Muslims a moderate and balanced alim [a learned one] is one who, defined by a minimum criteria, denounces harmful wife beating. While most of our traditional ulama and fuqaha [scholars] would principally agree on the un-Islamic nature of beating up women, many of the same clerics are however engaged in very peculiar debates on the ’Islamic’ legitimacy of gently nudging their wife(s) with a miswak [small wooden stick used to clean teeth]. Within this discourse the most moderate position acknowledges the material developments of time, and argue for the permissibility of a plastic toothbrush instead of the woody miswak. We have to realize that the image of male physical domination is not only created and upheld by islamophobes. It reflects a way of approaching ‘the sources to divine guidance’ that exists right in the midst of ‘mainstream‘ Islam.

The statements and fatawa on dealing with “a rebellious” woman are primarily based on a particular interpretation of the Quranic verse (4:34) and some other textual sources found in Muslim, Tirmidhi, Abu Daud, Nasai and Ibn Majah. This approach has cemented itself historically through e.g. Ibn Kathir, al-Tabari, Razi, al-Shafi or al-Nawawi. Many traditionalist scholars – it should rightfully be added – argue that it is just barely permissible, and should preferably be avoided, and they are justifying this opinion by ahadith [tradition or saying of the Prophet Muhammad, peace be upon him] on the Prophet’s personal feelings with regard to this problem. And some again stress that beating, nudging or tapping should be a symbolic act, if resorted to at all.

When topics like wife beating comes up I hear many lay Muslims explain away their adherence to this discourse. Many are evidently uncomfortable with the toothbrush-tapping “but we have to remember that it is only allowed as a last resort”, the apology goes. We know this line of reasoning from other debates too, such as the discussions on the hudud punishments. Here the argument is that the procedural criteria for enforcing the punishments are so strict and demanding that they are almost impossible to implement. However those who have pushed for making stoning a part of legal sharia [Islamic jurisprudence] and implemented it as a punishment in our time have no history of taking such procedural criteria seriously.

Despite this, the reason why many Muslim still “principally” defend such ideas is that they don’t want to sell out from Islamic authenticity and are afraid of the consequences of taking the critical debate that is much needed today.

The apologetic reasoning is actually implying that part of Islam or ‘sharia’ is not really universally applicable or functional in its ideal form. The fear of being a “sell out” displays the tragic irony of the matter: It’s a matter of loyalty towards religion, faithfulness and the fear for not being a good Muslim. This fear, and the idea that scrutinizing the way we approach our sources of guidance is a sign of giving into the demands of ‘the west’ is highly problematic. Sticking to patriarchic interpretations and practices work in contradiction to what is commonly known as the purposes/maqasid of sharia: to be good Muslims; ethical human beings.

This is not about satisfying “western’ discourse on Islam as many Muslims would too quickly and hackneyedargue, when avoiding taking the critical and complicated debates among ourselves. On the contrary it is about becoming aware about who we acknowledge as authorities and why we do so. I continuously experience Muslims displaying an awkward discomfort with what they insist is ‘sharia,’ and still explain their dilemma away as a ‘very very’ rare rule to be implemented, an exception, or an almost impossible rule to implement. In terms of being good Muslims, what do we really gain of sticking to interpretations which are only “theoretical possible” or only applicable in an “ideal” utopia.

Several contemporary Muslim intellectuals have already challenged the traditional reading. These scholars often engage in philological or linguistic debate on the reading of Q 4:34 to denounce the “beating” translation of the Quranic verb idribu. The arguments are that Arabic is such rich a language that many meanings can be read out of the Quran. The weakness in these kinds of arguments is that they are based on an argument of ‘ambiguity’ and that every ‘reading is an interpretation’, which by the logic of the argument allows equal legitimacy for those interpretations that they do not agree with.

Ultimately the debate that should be taken is not only a linguistic one. It is not only to look at the Quran and approaching the ambivalence of the word, even though I recognize the discursive advantage in doing so. But our fundamental dilemmas would not be solved by such approaches alone. It is not either about counting the amount of “strong” ahadith on how to make a statement to a rebellious wife, nor to count the ones where the Prophet displayed his concern for gender equity. Nor is it about facilitating more female or feminist interpretations of the places in the Quran and the ahadith where, the practices related to Muslim women are deduced from. Unfortunately the problems of patriarchy in Muslim interpretation and practices are not solved if we alone focus on educating more females in the traditions of jurisprudence that is dominating the discourses about what constitute the Islamic.

The challenge for us today is more foundational and requires courage to question the premises of the knowledge that the middle-aged male ‘alim’ is shouting out from the minbar [pulpit] or writing in his bogus fatawa [religious ruling] on “women in Islam”. It is here that Muslim women should take the lead: changing the even discourse about what constitute the “Islamic” and who represents it.

Muslims and especially Muslim women suffering from silent acceptance of a narrow approach to religion should reconsider what is taken to be “religious knowledge” in the first place. As the Iranian scholar Abdol Karim Souroush has argued, keeping an issue within the five point scale from wajib [compulsory acts] (over mandub [recommended acts], mubah [neutral act neither seen as good nor bad], makruh [disliked] to haram [forbidden]) and moderating positions according to this scale is not sufficient to deal with the challenges that face Muslims today. An intellectual change is needed to broaden our understanding of what constitutes ‘Islamic knowledge,’ and thus what are legitimate sources – where to find our guidelines to ethical behavior.

Exclusively to rely on textual sources and their related sciences is based on a limited concept of revelation. As the European scholar Tariq Ramadan has argued in his recent book on Islamic ethics and liberation (Radical Reform) by basing our discourses and opinions on the reading of the Quran and the ahadith literature only, we are disregarding half of the revelation: the universe. Sciences that make us understand the universe, history, society and human relations are just as Islamic as sciences approaching the Quran and the ahadith. However these are often dismissed as being secular, thus creating an unnatural hierarchy between sciences and knowledge that ultimately are all human.

I know many would object to my argument, by saying that the Quran is the complete guidance from God. I am not challenging the right to maintain this belief, but pointing at the fact that our reading and knowledge about the Quran is ultimately human. And the way we decide to apply what is ‘in there’ is ultimately human. The authority we have given the ahadith literature is human. The way we have chosen to understand its function, as a practical guidance is human and historically contingent. Creating hierarchy between ‘religious’ and ‘secular’ sciences is to create hierarchy between people and knowledge that again is based on a narrow understanding of who is dealing with the sacred. And in real world practices, I am tempted to say that the reverse hierarchy ought to be the case. Those we count as ‘our great’ ulama, the textual scholars are oftentimes the slumdogs of society who enjoy the reputation of being great scholars because they can readily (at least in some instances) quote our great ancestors.

In order to behave as ethical and spiritual human beings in accordance to universal principles of justice and equity, there is an important task ahead of us if we want to remain loyal, faithful and good Muslims. We should honestly ask ourselves what improves our sense of ethical behavior and our sense of gender equity. Look at the quotations and videos below: Are we really bearing the witness? Are we aware that many of our traditions and practices, exclusivist ideas of Muslim identity, have been institutionalized in a very narrow concept of the sacred and revelation. The conceptual history of religion within Islamic tradition is in desperate need to take a new route that does not reconstruct artificial divisions between religious and secular knowledge.

Some examples of the “miswak”-discourse:

In his book Gender equity in Islam, Jamal Badawi, member of the Islamic Society of North America (ISNA) Fiqh Council has written “In the event of a family dispute, the Qur’an exhorts the husband to treat his wife kindly and not to overlook her positive aspects. If the problem relates to the wife’s behavior, her husband may exhort her and appeal for reason. In most cases, this measure is likely to be sufficient. In cases where the problem continues, the husband may express his displeasure in another peaceful manner by sleeping in a separate bed from hers. There are cases, however where a wife persists in deliberate mistreatment of her husband and disregard for her marital obligations. Instead of divorce, the husband may resort to another measure that may save the marriage, at least in some cases. Such a measure is more accurately described as a gentle tap on the body…”

On the Arab Islamweb.net and several other fatwa banks, it is not unusual to find statements like the following: “The husband has the right to beat his wife (lightly) if she shows signs of ill-conduc

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